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2009 Fishing Reports

Fishing Report 20th November 2009

As the weather continues to heat up more and more as does the summer fishing! While the majority of us would rather be indoors lapping up some extreme air conditioning, anglers who chase the likes of mangrove jack, jew, flathead and big summer whiting are out braving the fierce heat, sweating up a storm casting and retrieving plastics, poppers, switchblades and bait into the strike zones. The 35 degrees (and then some) marks the true start of the summer season when you can expect sensational beach fishing. Whiting and dart can be hooked at the edges of deeper gutters where the swell is stirring up the sand and all the little crustaceans that inhabit the area. The golden rule is to fish as lightly as possible for dart and whiting so you may have some fun playing them in to shore. Use a similar bait as you would in the rivers – worms, pippies and squid. A #1 bait holder or #4 long shank hook, surf sinker and at least a 50cm leader of slightly heavier line will set you up to target these species. They will be feeding in the shallower gutters and can often be seen in the breaking waves if the water is clear. Top spots along the Sunshine Coast include Currimundi Beach, Kawana at Access 18- 20, Maroochy North Shore, Marcoola to Yaroomba, Sunshine Beach, Marcus Beach, Noosa North Shore and in front of Teewah village.

The bigger fish – tailor and jew can also be targeted at night and on a full tide in teh middle of a deep green gutter. They have sharp teeth that will cut through line, so be prepared with heavier rigs, thicker line and some traces. Pilchards of the WA variety, gar, small mullet strips, froggies and white bait on a gang of linked hooks will do the trick. The beaches with a section of coffee rock or a headland nearby tend to be better for jew and tailor. Try Pt Cartwright, Pincushion, Yaroomba Rocks and the Noosa National Park area.

If you are looking forward to seeking out a shady patch in one of the local rivers, then whiting, flathead, trevally or mangrove jack are the fish for you! Low tide is the preferred time of attack for a hungry whiting or flathead and often along a nice shallow patch of water beside a sand bank or mud flat. If trevally or mangrove jack take your fancy you need to be in known feeding areas with a lifelike lure, soft plastic or live bait and try to sit 1-2hrs either side of high tide.

Whiting are the bread and butter summer species targeted by all types of anglers who love a challenge with light line as well as the reward of sweet tasting fillets that melt in your mouth. Whiting feed on shallow sand or muddy yabby banks throughout the local rivers. Whiting will forage in the mud feeding on small worms and crustaceans as they move along the banks. Blood worms, yabbies, soldier crabs, small pipis and sand worms are all part of the whiting’s diet. Recently anglers have been using small poppers no more than 4cm long to bloop over the banks on the making tide for quality whiting. The Gulp sand and blood worm varieties have proven to be an effective soft plastic on whiting in the rivers. Try Maroochy River Mouth to Black Banks, The Sand Basin and La Balsa Park at Mooloolaba, Munna and Culgoa Points in Noosa and just inside the Caloundra bar.

Flathead are the ultimate ambushing predator which loves to feed up on the banks during an incoming tide and hang on the edge of drop off when the tides going out. They also love to feed around creek mouths, deeper holes, weed beds and river bends. Flathead will eat a wide variety of baits including live bait in the form of herring or mullet, fresh prawn, small pilchards and flesh baits. Soft plastics have been the most successful way to target flathead yet. Flathead, being the gullible fish they are, will hammer most forms of soft and hard lures which pass their nose. Fish all drop-offs and shallow beds in Pumicestone Passage, Currimundi Creek, Mooloolah River and Canals, Maroochy River and Noosa inlet.

Trevally can be found on the high tide feeding around the schools of herring and prawns. They move throughout the rivers stopping at the usual creek/canal entrances, deep holes and channels, bridge pylons, rocky areas and along the edge of weed beds looking for moving bait. Basically find the schools of bait and you will usually find some trevally. These fish were built for speed and are born lure chasers. Some of the better tried and proven lures include: 20g Surecatch Knights, River2Sea Bubble Pop45, RMG Scorpion 68, Prawn Star Shrimp and Powerbaits in the 3inch size. All river systems between Caloundra and Noosa are playgrounds for this fun fighting fish!

Mangrove jack rarely leave their snaggy hideouts unless you present a very attractive looking lure or livebait. Then they will hit hard and perform a perfect 180 degree turn and smashes the lure or bait apart on their way back to home. By the time you realise, the jack already has your line entwined in his snags and you are instantly busted off as the tight line touches one of the many oysters attached to the snag! Target jacks around fallen trees, rocky areas, mangrove roots, concrete pylons and deep holes holding bait – we have plenty of these structures in around McKenzies Bridge, the Cod Hole and Noosa Sound. The best bait for jacks is always live - like mullet, herring, prawn and gar. They will also slam mullet fillet and pilchards when extra hungry.

With this in mind, it is worth popping away the winter bream rigs and breaking out the summer species set up you’ve been waiting to break out once the weather ‘heats up’!

jordanmatthewan70cmflatheadchambersisland 

Flathead numbers in the Maroochy River have increased over the last month with plenty of quality catches over the weekend. Jordan Matthewan was fishing with fresh prawn from Chambers Island with his family and caught this 70cm dusky flathead for his efforts.

barbmcintyre3.3kggoldentrevallycodhole 

Golden, giant and big eyed trevally have been very active around the motorway bridge pylons with the recent influx of herring in the rivers. Barb McIntyre fished with a live herring in the early hours of the morning for this solid 3.3kg golden trevally.

 

jasonarmstrongsweetlipoldwomenisland

The warmer months are always a good time to target grass sweetlip on the inshore reefs. Jason Armstrong has been fresh mullet

fillets around Old Women Island in the morning for a couple of kilogram fish.

barryneundorf2.75kgjackcainbridge

Hot humid days like those that the northerly winds have produced lately are prime conditions for mangrove jack fishing. Barry Neundorf fished with a live poddy mullet around the cane bridge in the upper reaches for this 2.75kg specimen.

FISHING REPORT: Get on board with TT Lures - Switchblades 09/10/2009

GET ON BOARD WITH TT LURES SWITCHBLADES

One indication that summer is fast approaching (apart from the freak thunder storm we experienced Wednesday afternoon!) is the talking up of fancy new products on the market just in time for the painful Christmas present purchasing period, tackle included.  I still maintain that ‘last minute’ is the best way to go, though my wife truly believes that all year-round there are numerous present-buying opportunities (aka Sales!).  If only I could buy lures for all my loved ones, Christmas would be so simple!

Something that did really catch my eye in the past month is a lure called the TT Switchblade, that although not overly new to the market, has come to the party with hot new colours and new size/weight which is ideal for use in local rivers, all just in time for the summer fishing season.

The TT Switchblade has been on the market for a few years in a variety of natural and bright colourings.  They are metal vibration bait which is fast becoming the weapon of choice for serious bream, bass and yellowbelly anglers.  Though in the Maroochy and Noosa rivers the new larger 3/8 size have been working a treat for flathead, trevally, school jew and even chopper tailor.  The largest option is the 1/2oz which is an excellent option for some larger species like snapper, northern reefies and mulloway.

This lure can be hopped or slow-rolled across shallow flats, vertically jigged against steep structure, or burned mid-water through schooled fish.   The Switchblade has proven itself time and again in some of the toughest tournament conditions, nailing kicker bream and bass from deeper water. It excels in dirty conditions, the blade body giving off just the right shimmy to attract predatory strikes from fish. Switchblade's are accounting for more and more species every day, small snapper on light bream tackle, reefies over shallow flats in the tropics, and fat trout and yellowbelly in the impoundments.

Local angler Danny Brooks has been reaping the rewards with TT Switchblades this year and has offered some tips for anglers when beginning to use Vibration lures.  The Switchblade has three holes for attaching your snap swivel and how you use these holes will affect the motion and direction the lure responds.

“I use the first hole along the back for jigging mainly from a boat.  In deep holes I watch for baitfish moving past and then cast out and draw downwards and jig in an upward motion towards against the tide”.

“The second hole I mainly use for bank casting in the Using high and low motions, wave your rod up once and twice then allow the lure to sink again.  It is almost a technique of 1st up/down sweep; allow sinking, 2nd up/down then sinking until you have brought your lure back to the bank for another cast” says Danny.

“The third hole is best used in your boat for trolling on the making tide past structures like bridge pylons and jetties as the vibration from the trolling will lure out your predator fish who will be lurking around these structures awaiting an oblivious baitfish”.

As you can see Danny has tried and tested all the methods of using TT Switchblades to their full potential.  He is on location for the full tide at the Cod Hole mostly, armed with a variety of colours and a few golden coloured Squidgies as back-up.  The past week Danny has used the Golden Boy, Red Nightmare, Silver and Purple Glimmer colours which have been successful for school jew, trevally and flathead.

Like many tackle companies, the gang at TT Lures have listened to their loyal fans suggestions and have brought out four new colours for Christmas.   Brown mongrel (pictured has a light silver belly and goes into a deep orangey-brown along the backbone and has been tested in the Pine River for flathead and trevally with brilliant hook-up ratios.  The Purple Bruiser has a fluoro pink belly and a dark purple body and is excellent in clear water on a high tide for tailor and trevally, the same goes for Aussie Gold which is a swirly combination of green gold and orange.  Peacock Blue is best suited to clear days on the local reefs due to its extremely glistening light blue colourings with a green head and fluoro orange belly!

The Switchblade is proving to be one of the most versatile lures to hit the water in recent years, and the new larger sizes are adding to that reputation every day.

So call in and have a chat to the staff at Swan Boat Hire as they are all getting into Switchblades and are also sending out the most subtle of hints to their better halves for Christmas!


LOCAL FISHING REPORT

Noosa: Tailor to 3kg at dawn and dusk along Teewah beach.  Trevally and tailor to 2.3kg in Woods Bay.  Whiting to 700g in the frying pan.  Flathead from the rock wall in the bar. Mangrove jacks above the lakes, in between the lakes and in the canals.


Maroochy: Tailor to 2kg from Mudjimba Beach over night. Sand whiting throughout the lower reaches. Trevally to 1kg, tarpon, flathead and tailor to 1kg around the bridge pylons on herring and switch blades.  Mud crabs above bli bli bridge.


Kawana: Whiting and flathead at access 18-22. Squid off the rock walls over night. Plenty of good trevally along the La Balsa stretch and off the Kawana pontoon. Mangrove jack in Parrearra channel. Mud crabs in the upper reaches.


Caloundra: School mackerel in the mornings on metal slugs form the rocks at Moffat. Flathead along Bullcock Beach and  just inside the bar.  Whiting from the power boat club on blood worms.  Flathead to 60cm and bream from the Military Jetty.


 

 

Bream love the vibration of the 3/8oz TT Switchblade and will hit on the jigging motion.

The Brown Mongrel is tipped to be the pick of colours for the upcoming Summer flathead and trevally season.

 

Robert Whiting endured the freak storm on Wednesday to bring home this 750g tailor in the North Channel near the Cod Hole.

Danny Brookes with a flathead and trevally caught on a jigged Red Nightmare coloured 3/8oz Switchblade off the bank at Yinni Street.

Ben Nothling bagged out on snapper in the 3kg to 5kg range while fishing 'The Muds' with thankswww.fishingnoosa.com.au

 

 

 

FISHING REPORT: Fishing Rules and Size Limits 1/10/2009

KEEP UP TO DATE WITH FISHING RULES AND REGULATIONS!

As the a busy Spring holiday season draws to an end in Queensland, you’d can be forgiven for thinking it was actually the Summer holidays given the perfect, hot days with huge crowds of families on the beaches and in the waterways.  It was pleasing to see many families fishing together in the Maroochy River and also spending time at places such as SunCoast Barra Farm.  With large numbers of people fishing came several good weigh-ins, identification of species and many reports of the one that got away!

What was disappointing was witnessing some anglers ignoring legal limits and bag limits.  Many anglers who have been caught in the act of keeping undersize fish have been known to use the excuse “The size limits change so often, that I just can’t keep up!”. This week the focus will be on educating anglers who may not be aware of the current size and bag limits which were revised in March this year by the DPI.  If you feel you may not be up-to-date or the words “bag limit” and “size limit” are completely foreign, then you must read on!

In all states of Australia, including Queensland, there are limits on the size of fish that can be legally taken and this varies from species to species. There are minimum size limits and also some maximum size limits as often the larger, more mature fish of a species are the breeding females and need to be left alone to continue on the reproduction of a species.

Size limits are not just a random number pulled out of a politician’s hat!  There’s much calculation over time based on biological research into each species´ reproductive cycles. The DPI state that minimum size limits generally allow fish to spawn at least once and contribute to the population before they are taken. And in some species the larger individuals contribute more to the population, which is why maximum size limits apply. Flathead for example release spawn at their most mature size and most barramundi begin their lives as males and later, as they grow larger, become females. A maximum size limit is applied to protect large females and to allow them to spawn.

A bag limit is the number of fish that one person can legally take and keep. These limits serve several purpose including; conserving heavily-exploited species, conserving species that are susceptible to capture, sharing the catch more equitably among anglers, reducing the illegal marketing of fish and sending out a message promoting ethical and responsible behaviour when using a limited natural resource.

HOW TO MEASURE:

Measuring  the bag limit is as simple as counting the number of legal-sized fish you have caught and wish to take home – there is no excuse for keeping in excess of the legal bag limit and anglers caught doing this are simply greedy.

To measure the legal size (length) of a fish a ruler is a must as guessing is just risky.  The fish needs to be measured from the tip of their snout to the end of their tail (not the inside of the concaved tail but the longest most point). With crabs the measurement is across the carapace, from the widest most tip on the left to the widest most point on the right.  If you unintentionally take a fish that is not the legal size or is unwanted, return it to the water immediately, taking as much care as possible to avoid causing injury to the fish.

Though many of the key species caught in the river this year are limit-less or have had very little variance in bag or size limit, below are the most recent regulations for local estuary species:

Mud crab – 15cm min for Males, Bag limit of 10

Sand crab – 11.5cm min for Males, No bag limit

Sand whiting – 23cm min, Bag limit of 30

Bream and tarwhine – 23cm min (though changing to 25cm in March 2010), Bag limit of 30

Dusky flathead – 40cm min to 75cm max, Bag limit of 5

Trevally - No size limit, Bag limit of 20

Luderick – 30cm min, Bag limit of 10

Mangrove jack – 35cm min, Bag limit of 5

Jew/Mulloway – 75cm min, Bag limit of 2

Dart – 30cm min, Bag limit of 30

Tailor – 30cm min (though changing to 35cm in March 2010), Bag limit of 20

Goldspotted and blackspotted rockcod (aka estuary cod) – 38cm min to 120cm max, Bag limit of 5

If we all abide by the legal size and bag limits while taking it it our stride to educate future generations of angler and ever re-educated our angling friends who may not be quite up-to-date with current regulations, then together we can all fish for the future!


LOCAL FISHING REPORT


 

Noosa: Tailor, dart and a few whiting along the North Shore and Teewah beach.  Mangrove jack, trevally and flathead between the Lakes.  Whiting and bream in the river mouth and Munna Point Bridge area.  Jew and a few flathead also along the Tewantin reach.

Maroochy: Tailor along the beaches at night, a few jew to 5kg at the Yaroomba Rocks. Whiting and flathead around Cotton Tree, the Black Bank and also the mud bank in front of Eudlo Creek entrance.  Trevally to 1.5kg  between the Cod Hole and Chambers Island. Flathead and mangrove jack near Dunethin Rock and Petrie Creek.

Kawana: Bream and dart along Kawana Beach. Golden trevally and a few big-eye trevally at La Balsa.  Bream, squire, sweetlip, flathead and tarwhine along the rockwall. Bream on soft baits around the moorings and sand crabs near the mouth.  Mangrove jack in the canals.

Caloundra: Queenies on live bait inside Caloundra bar. Flathead in the shallow channels that lead to the bar.  Trevally, small snapper and tailor off the rocks at Moffat headland.  Tarpon at Pelican Waters canal, a few mangrove jack in Coochin Creek and put the pots in this weekend around the upper reaches!

 


 

1. Mark McNaughton from Brisbane holds up a thumper 3kg teraglin jewfish (legal length: 38cm min) caught at Double Island Point on Charterboat Cougar One (with thanks www.fishingnoosa.com.au)

2.       Corey Schembri is cvautious to only keep flathead between 40 and 75cm – including these two from Bli Bli area.

3.       Gary Gardiner weighed in this 5.4kg tailor from Teewah which was well and truly over 30cm legal length.

 

 

FISHING REPORT: Soft Plastics Fishing with Angler's Advantage 24/09/2009

GET THE ADVANTAGE WITH BRIAN FROM ANGLER'S ADVANTAGE

Have the kids been putting in the time but rewarding catches have been a little light on for their effort?  Or do you have an avid angler who needs some guidance to refine their skills?  The school holidays are the perfect time to spend some quality time with the kids, teaching them the lifelong skills of casting, retrieving, filleting and then cooking! If you are stretched for time, or feel the kids are more than capable and will even outsmart you in angling prowess, perhaps it is a good idea to enlist in some help from a person who know fishing best: Brian from Angler’s Advantage Charters.

A great way for your son or daughter to reach the next level in fishing (beyond getting legal bread and butter species like bream and whiting) is to get out and about on the local rivers with a guide who has over 3 decades of angling experience across 4 continents!  Brian Readman is your man – he has targeted everything from big game like marlin and sailfish to the likes of barra and bream.  Brian’s speciality is soft plastics, and his passion is sharing his skills and teaching others. If you have ever wanted to master the art of fishing with hard and soft lures, then you need to take the opportunity to learn from one of the best in the business.

Brian started the business Angler’s Advantage to let him spend time doing the thing he loves most and to be able to bring pleasure to others while fishing on our beautiful local rivers.  Brian will take you and your avid junior angler on his custom built Polycraft 4.8m Brumby which is excellent for reaching a number of local hotspots during a trip.  Brian has a Navman colour depth sounder to locate contours and bottom structure where the fish love to congregate.

If you haven’t got the latest and greatest tackle, you need not worry as Brian has a variety of top quality combos on board all ideally suited to the artistic finesse of lure fishing. But bring your own combo along if you wish.

Coupling Brian’s experience with your youngster’s eagerness should be a recipe for success in targeting flathead, trevally, estuary cod and even jew in the rivers.  Brian always starts a trip by looking at the features needed in a rod and reel suitable for river use, then goes through the skills required for each species targeted plus how to best use soft plastics and hard bodied lures in the hunt.

Brian has compiled an extensive document called ” Top 7 Soft Plastic strategies” which is a great starting point for those interesting in getting into the sport. The following is a brief outline of those soft plastic strategies:

1.       Get the right gear for softplastics – this includes picking the best rod/reel combo with a light, whippy feel but superior in sensitivity, matching specific line to species targeted and choosing the correct jigheads.

2.       Proper lure selection is essential to your success out on the water. What works one day might not get any results the next. The key is to not fall into the trap of having a ‘favourite lure’. The golden rule is to give your chosen lure 10 minutes of solid fishing time. If after 10 minutes it’s not getting hit, change lures. You might like to try a different style of lure, but most likely will only need to change colours.

3.       Make your lure work and come back towards yourself in a twitchy or alternating action. Don't just wind it in! A key rule with Soft Plastics is that you can never retrieve it too slowly. If you think you are going too slow but are still not getting hits, you are probably not going slowly enough.

4.       Use fluorocarbon leader and learn your knots.  Fluorocarbon has the same light refractive index as water so it makes it practically invisible under the water. The lighter the leader the more chances you have of hooking up but too light and the greater the risk of bust off! The key is to start off as light as you think you can go, and then switch to slightly heavier leader if you find that you’re consistently getting busted off.

5.       Reading the water or knowing where to look for the fish. Fish love structure or somewhere they can lie and wait to ambush their prey. Mud flats are fantastic spots for species like flathead and bream. The outgoing tide flows along the sides of the mud flats, washing the smaller bait fish, and other inhabitants like yabbies and crabs into the deeper channels.

6.       Time of day and the state of tide are important. Remember the age old adage the early bird catches the worm. Fish will fire sometimes of day better than others. Early morning, just on dawn or as the sun is dropping in the sky is probably the best time of day for increasing your chances of a hot spell.

7.       Be quiet. Nothing spooks fish more than noise, particularly in shallow water. Approach likely spots as quietly as possible, the use of an electric motor is highly recommended for your final approach and hang off as far as is possible. Don't bang stuff around the floor and keep your conversation as quiet as possible.

If you want more info on the type of service Brian has to offer, give him a call on 0424 788 379 or you can check out his website: www.anglersadvantage.com.au and even download his Top 7 Soft Plastic strategies in full for your reading pleasure.

LOCAL FISHING REPORT

 

Noosa: Good whiting, bream and dart along the North Shore and Teewah Village. Flathead on soft plastics in the lower reaches of the river on low tide. Good whiting between the river mouth and Munna Point. Reports of mangrove jack and golden trevally in Harbourtown area.

Maroochy:Plenty of flathead throughout the channels between the river mouth and Cod Hole.  Whiting to 42cm in excellent numbers near the Twin Waters Jetty and along the Bli Bli reach. Trevally and bream at the northern end of Goat Island, and the mouth of Petrie Creek.  Mangrove jack near Dunethin Rock and the mouth of Coolum Creek.

Kawana: Bream, a few flathead and whiting along the beaches, best towards Point Cartwright.  Bream and sand crabs in the lower reaches of the river.  Trevally, estuary cod and mangrove jack in the canals and mud crabs in the upper reaches.

Caloundra: Flathead along the drop-offs and shallow banks inside Caloundra Bar.  Trevally, school mackerel, sweetlip and snapper off the rocks at Moffat.  Good whiting opposite the Power Boat Club and towards Coochin Creek.  Mud crabs in the Bribie reach of Pumicestone Passage.

 

1.       Jackson had a good session out with Brian to catch and release this juvenile bream at the river mouth.

2.       Carolyn used a 3inch minnow for a nice flathead which she caught and then release at the Maroochy River mouth.

3.       Jordan proudly displays a legal flathead caught on light line while under the guidance of Brian.

4.       Pauline Tilgals fished near Teewah Village earlier on this week and was rewarded for her full day’s fishing with this 4kg tailor!

FISHING REPORT: Super Summer Species on September Holidays 18/09/2009

SCHOOL HOLIDAY SPECIES

With the school holidays beginning at precisely 3:01pm Friday afternoon, so for the next 21 days, you can expect the local waterways to be inundated with junior anglers wielding the latest and greatest 6’6” combos in every colour of the rainbow, sand castles and sand traps will be found in places you would least expect and young paddlers will be testing their skills on kayaks, paddleskis and inflatable boats shaped like a giant purple lobster!

 

The school holidays also mean record crowds at beaches, long queues at the shopping precincts and bad drivers inadvertently putting your blood pressure through the roof. So with that in mind, I still know where I would be – on the water with the kids enjoying what the river has to offer! So how do you keep the kids happy with a relatively low-cost stress-free fishing trip to one of those spots in our back pockets (and away from the traffic and shopping mayhem)?  Take some time out to hit the water and target the four following species which will make up the majority of catches from now until summer.  Hopefully the kids will end up with a few in their buckets and take a good story back to school to share with their friends.

 

Whiting: The bread and butter species targeted by young and old anglers who love a challenge with light line as well as the reward of sweet tasting fillets that melt in your mouth. Whiting feed on shallow sand or muddy yabby banks throughout the local rivers.  Try Maroochy River Mouth to Black Banks, The Sand Basin and La Balsa Park at Mooloolaba, Munna and Culgoa Points in Noosa and just inside the Caloundra bar.  Best results are usually on the bigger high tides around full and new moon phases during summer. Whiting will forage in the mud feeding on small worms and crustaceans as they move along the banks. Blood worms, yabbies, soldier crabs, small pipis and sand worms are all part of the whiting’s diet. Recently anglers have been using small poppers no more than 4cm long to bloop over the banks on the making tide for quality whiting. The Gulp sand and blood worm varieties have proven to be an effective soft plastic on whiting in the rivers.

 

Flathead: The ultimate ambush predator which loves to feed up on the banks during high tide and hang on the edge of drop off when the tides going out. They also love to feed around creek mouths, deeper holes, weed beds and river bends. Flathead will eat a wide variety of baits including live bait in the form of herring or mullet, fresh prawn, small pilchards and flesh baits. Soft plastics have been the most successful way to target flathead yet. Flathead, being the gullible fish they are, will hammer most forms of soft and hard lures which pass their nose.  Fish all drop-offs and shallow beds in Pumicestone Passage, Currimundi Creek, Mooloolah River and Canals, Maroochy River and Noosa inlet.  Also worth fishing gutters along the surf beaches for bar-tail and dusky flathead.

 

Trevally: Found usually on the high tide feeding around the schools of herring and prawns. They move throughout the rivers stopping at the usual creek/canal entrances, deep holes and channels, bridge pylons, rocky areas and along the edge of weed beds looking for moving bait. Basically find the schools of bait and you will usually find some trevally. These fish were built for speed and are born lure chasers. Some of the better tried and proven lures include: 20g Surecatch Knights,River2Sea Bubble Pop45, RMG Scorpion 68, Prawn Star Shrimp and Powerbaits in the 3inch size. All river systems between Caloundra and Noosa are playgrounds for these fun fighting fish!

 

Mangrove Jacks: A ‘jack attack’ occurs when a solid mangrove jack departs his snaggy home, does a 180 degree turn and smashes the lure or bait on his way back to the snag. By the time you strike, the Jack already has your line entwined in his snags and you are instantly busted off as the tight line touches one of the many oysters attached to the snag! Not all mangrove jack hit this hard and fast around snags. They tend to move away from their snag into open water overnight. Target Jacks around fallen trees, rocky areas, mangrove roots, concrete pylons and deep holes holding bait – we have plenty of these structures in around McKenzies Bridge, the Cod Hole and Noosa Sound. The best bait for jacks is always live - like mullet, herring, prawn and gar. They will also slam mullet fillet and pilchards when extra hungry. Hard bodied lures like the C-Lure “Jack Snack” and most softies like 3-4” Powerbaits work affectively on jacks.

 

For the kids (and even big kids) who have been bitten by the soft plastic bug and want to practice their jigging, twitching and jerking techniques then give a WildEye Twitching Nipper a go! The WildEye Twitching Nippers by Storm have been on the market for a few years now and work really well in SE Queensland estuaries for a wide variety of species. Recently Storm released an unrigged version of the Twitching Nipper in Australia and it has been a huge success with a broad range of fisherman. WildEye Twitching Nippers are by far the most realistic soft plastics lure on the market because they are a dead ringer of the saltwater yabby in shape and size. They come in a wide range of colours that include a natural colour that is the same as the native saltwater yabby, a pink colour, pumpkinseed and orange. Storm has released two sizes of Twitching Nipper in Australia to replicate the average size of the local yabby, these include a small 5.5cm specimen and a bigger 7cm version.

 

Nearly every species of fish in the river will feed on yabbies at some stage of their lives; even vegetarian species like luderick have been known to eat yabbies at times. I believe this is why when you use the Twitching Nipper you could literally catch anything .

 

LOCAL FISHING REPORT

Noosa: Whiting, bream and tailor to 4kg between North Shore and Double Island Point. Mangrove jack and trevally on lures between the Lakes and also at night in Noosa Sound.  Whiting throughout the lower reaches of the river.  Flathead in Weyba Creek.

Maroochy: Tailor and whiting in the surf between Marcoola and Pincushion Island.  Bream and chopper tailor around Goat Island.  Whiting on bloodworm and small poppers throughout the lower reaches.  Flathead on prawn-style lures in the Cod Hole, and from Godfrey’s Rd to Bli Bli. Try for jew on the evening high tide.

Kawana: Bream, whiting, flathead and dart along Kawana Beach and just north of the entrance to Currimundi Lake. Trevally and gar along the bank at La Balsa Park. Mangrove jack and estuary cod around McKenzies Bridge. Try for muddies in the canal systems

Caloundra: School mackerel and tailor taken off the rocks at Moffat Beach. Whiting and flathead just inside the river mouth and along Golden Beach.  A few flathead on lures in the mouth of Bells Creek. Try for jacks and trevally in Pelican Waters Canals.


zaydengladmanyellowbellyfromburrumbadamonaspinner

Zayden Gladman proudly holds up a golden perch caught at Borumba Dam on a spinnerbait.

 

kenolliemarkmurphysamberjackyellowtailkingspangled

Ken, Ollie and Mark spent a day bonding at Murphy’s Reef and took home amberjack, yellowtail king and spangled emperor.

 

daveplummichealwilkinsonmrslfc5kgsnapperhards

Dave Plum and Micheal Wilkinson were all smiles after boating these 5kg snapper at The Hards!

 

shanepowell900gbreamgoatislandonrunintide

Shane Powell fished the run out tide near Goat Island to target this 900g bream on fresh prawns.


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